The RiverWorks Discovery Patch Program is based on the idea that the best place to begin emphasizing the importance of America’s water resources is with America’s children. To that end, incentives in the form of colorful patches are offered to encourage parents, teachers, and leaders of youth organizations to take children (ages 8-12) on field trips to rivers, lakes, streams, and wetlands in their own localities. Once there, children fulfill patch requirements that are educational, interesting, and fun. Two patches, Otter and Duck, are offered in this program.

RWDOtterPatchTake home an Otter!
Otter Patch Requirements
Age eight:
  1. Take part in a supervised visit to a river, stream, or wetland.
  2. Sign the Kids for Clean Rivers Pledge.
  3. Complete one additional activity from any of the RiverWorks Discovery Logbooks, Leader’s Guides, or Activity Sheets
Ages nine and ten:
  1. Take part in a supervised visit to a river, stream, or wetland.
  2. Sign the Kids for Clean Rivers Pledge.
  3. Complete two additional activities from any of theRiverWorks Discovery Logbooks, Leader’s Guides, or Activity Sheets.
Ages eleven and twelve:
  1. Take part in a supervised visit to a river, stream, or wetland.
  2. Sign the Kids for Clean Rivers Pledge.
  3. Complete three additional activities from any of the RiverWorks Discovery Logbooks, Leader’s Guides, or Activity Sheets.
RWDDuckPatchTake home a Duck!
Duck Patch Requirements

The requirements for the Duck Patch are the same for all age groups.

  1. Take part in a supervised service project at a river, stream, or wetland site. Examples of service projects are cleaning up debris and trash along waterways, planting trees and shrubs, or helping with other projects sponsored by local water resource facilities.
  2. Sign the Kids for Clean Rivers Pledge.
Take home both!

Combine activities for the Otter Patch with service project and earn both patches.

Guidelines for Selecting Activities

Because of variations in age, capabilities, needs, and interests of children, the selection of activities from the aforementioned sources is left to the discretion of the group leader. The Leader’s Guides are excellent sources for group activities with detailed instructions and links to educational standards. For activities that are less structured, browse through the Wheelhouse and Wildlife Logbooks. There you will find group activities as well as individual projects involving prose and poetry writing, thinking creatively, and observing nature.